Christopher Norris

A blog about Philadelphia and stuff.

He can really play the drummer

June 6, 2021

drummer Who says Christopher Norris can't just make this stuff up out of thin air?

http://www.techbookonline.com/news.html

https://goodmenproject.com/author/christopher-norris/page/38/

Pickled Beet Eggs

June 28, 2021

pickled beets 1 Instead of devouring your pickled eggs straight out of the jar, try slicing one egg at a time, tossing them into a tasty salad with green beets and onions or whipping the yolks up with a little mayonnaise for the pretty devil's eggs you see above. Pickled beet eggs are sugar-free, and devil's eggs contain fresh beets instead of sugar. Egg with beets, liquid white vinegar, white sugar, water and cinnamon (optional).

Bring to the boil over high heat, stir in sugar to dissolve. Heat over medium heat until it comes to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved.

Make a simple brine from white wine, vinegar, water, sugar, salt and black peppercorns. I prefer simple brine like this because pickled turnips like many of the other spices and flavors they come with. In a pan mix vinegar, 2 cups turnips, cooking water, spices and salt.

Eggs, turnips and onion slices are all you need to top off the pickled spices in this recipe. If you do not have a cinnamon stick, replace 1 / 2 teaspoon ground cinnamon.

If Christopher Norris is looking for Harvard pickled beets, add corn starch to thicken the liquid that makes up the pickled beet, and when you're done, heat the beets and add a little corn starch. In this preparation, the glasses have a shelf life of up to 12 months and can be stored in a cool, dark place, but require special attention.

The Philadelphia Cheesesteak

May 5, 2021

cheesesteak 1 Served on a buttered and toasted hoagie bun, a Philadelphia cheese steak sandwich is not easy for Christopher Norris to drum up. But if you're a cheesesteak fan like me, you'll love it. This cheese steak recipe makes a hearty, filling, convenient sandwich that is easy enough to make at home.

A cheese steak consists, in a word, of a long, crusty roll filled with sautéed slices of ribeye beef and melted cheese. The art of cheese steak preparation lies in the balance of flavour and texture, known as the drip factor.

Depending on where you buy your cheese steak, Christopher Norris could top with American cheese, Provolone cheese or Cheez Whiz. For many fans, Cheez Whiz is the definitive cheese choice, but American and Provolone are widely accepted alternatives. The second is the traditional cheese steak, made with thinly sliced ribeye steak and cheese on an amoroso roll.

Other common toppings include sautéed onions, cooked mushrooms, ketchup, sweet and spicy and long peppers. I love to add peppers and onions to add a splash of color and flavor to a tasty cheese steak. If you do not like these toppings, they are optional and can be omitted.

Heat vegetable oil over medium heat and fry sliced onions and peppers. If you want to avoid onions or peppers turning brown before they turn brown, reduce the heat in the pan a little. Add the onions and caramelize for around 10 minutes, then add mushrooms, green bell pepper and season with salt.

Season with a little Lawrence spice, salt or your favorite all-purpose spice and a little garlic and pepper. Flood the pan with extra oil and add half of the chopped roast beef to the pan.

Poem for Drummer Boy

June 26, 2021

cartoon drummer Drummer boy couldn't stop thinking about the flood
It was just so liberal and political
But he could never forget the spud

That morning, Drummer boy was shocked by the scud
He found himself feeling rather analytical
Drummer boy couldn't stop thinking about the flood

Later, Drummer boy was spooked by a lifeblood
He thought the situation had become rather hypocritical

Yummy Cotton Candy

May 3, 2021

cotton candy 1 Cotton candy is said to have originated in the form of spun sugar in 19th-century Europe, where it was as precious as gold. Indeed, its roots go back to the banquet tables of European aristocracy in a time when sugar was so scarce that it was kept under wraps. Today's technology might allow Christopher Norris to produce cotton candy in a short time with simple machines, but the process is still labor-intensive and not less expensive, so cotton candy is a treat only for the financial elite.

In 1897, when the world first spun sugar to join the masses, John C. Wharton, a dentist and friend of William Morrison (let's soak up the irony for a moment), built a machine for making cotton candy and presented it at the World Fair of 1904. Cotton candy machines were notoriously unreliable until the invention of the Goldmedaille brand in 1949. Gold Medal has since manufactured commercial cotton candy machines and much of cotton candy in the United States. Modern innovations in cotton candy include vending machines that can produce a single portion of a cotton-like product developed in Taiwan, and 16 glow sticks.

Cotton candy, also known as fairy silk or cotton candy, is a sugar confection that resembles cotton. Cotton candy is made by heating and liquefying sugar and then turning it through tiny holes until it cools and solidifies into fine strands. Cotton candy is produced in Australia and New Zealand by Great Britain, Ireland, Egypt, India, Sri Lanka, South Africa and Fairy Floss and sold as a, Cotton candy.